Museum logo
Museum logo

Person Record

  • Email This Page
  • Send Feedback
Name LUVERA, Mary Thelma BABAROVICH

Associated Records

Image of 2013.077.080 - Tape, Audio Reel

2013.077.080 - Tape, Audio Reel

Cassette tape labeled: Babarovich family history, Mary Luvera with Barbara Jackson, 1978.

Image of 2013.077.081 - Tape, Audio Reel

2013.077.081 - Tape, Audio Reel

Cassette tape labeled: Early day history of Peter Babarovich family, 1904, as told by Mary Babarovich Luvera taped for Skagit County Museum 1979. The information contained may have been collected in tape 2013.077.080 of 1978.

Image of 2013.077.359 - Card, Greeting

2013.077.359 - Card, Greeting

Paul Luvera, Sr., gave this anniversary card to his wife, Mary Babarovich Luvera, on April 7, 1940. He wrote, "With more Love than ever, Paul."

Image of 2013.077.120 - Badge, Identification

2013.077.120 - Badge, Identification

Mary Thelma Luvera was issued this identification badge by the Captain of the Port on July 13, 1943. Her occupation is listed as Grocery Clerk, her sponsor was Luvera Grocery, and the card was signed by J. B. Calkins. The serial number for the card is 13007120. The card is laminated.

Image of 2013.077.126-129 - Badge, Identification

2013.077.126-129 - Badge, Identification

Mary Thelma Babarovich Luvera attended annual conventions of the Washington Merchants' Association between 1936 and 1940. These identification badges are from those events. .126-.128 list her name as Mrs. Paul Luvera; .129 lists it as simply Mrs. Luvera. .126 - 37th Annual Convention in Seattle on October 7-8, 1936; green ribbon .127 - 39th Annual Convention in Seattle on October 10-11, 1938; purple ribbon .128 - 40th Annual Convention in Spokane, 1939 .129 - 41st Annual Convention in Seattle, 1940

Image of EM.0349 - Tape, Audio Reel

EM.0349 - Tape, Audio Reel

Cassette tape labeled: Babarovich family history, Mary Luvera with Barbara Jackson, 1978.

Image of 2013.077.137.001-.002 - Card, Identification

2013.077.137.001-.002 - Card, Identification

Paul N. Luvera was elected to the Washington State Senate in 1952 and served 1953-1957. He had these 1955 floor passes which were not good while the Senate was in session. .001,A,B - two passes signed by Luvera .002 - one pass which was to admit Mrs. Paul N. Luvera, also signed by Luvera.

Image of EM.0350 - Tape, Audio Reel

EM.0350 - Tape, Audio Reel

Cassette tape labeled: Early day history of Peter Babarovich family, 1904, as told by Mary Babarovich Luvera taped for Skagit County Museum 1979. The information contained may have been collected in tape 2013.077.080 of 1978.

Image of 2013.077.190 - Release, News

2013.077.190 - Release, News

An agency in Mt. Vernon mailed this press release about the background information to many newspapers. It tells of how Paul Luvera, encouraged by his wife Mary, came to his second career as a carver of totem poles. Paul N. Luvera, Sr., retired in 1957 after running Luvera's Grocery and being a Washington State Senator. Approximately 1962 he started a second career, carving totem poles which his wife Mary painted in "real" Indian colors. Unable to find a book telling how to carve Indian totem poles, Luvera taught himself to carve in the authentic style from several tribal post cards he bought in Victoria, British Columbia. In 1976 he started writing "How To Carve (and paint) Totem Poles."

Image of 2013.077.189 - Negative

2013.077.189 - Negative

Paul N. Luvera, Sr., retired in 1957 after running Luvera's Grocery and being a Washington State Senator. Approximately 1962 he started a second career, carving totem poles which his wife Mary painted in "real" Indian colors. Unable to find a book telling how to carve Indian totem poles, Luvera taught himself to carve in the authentic style from several tribal post cards he bought in Victoria, British Columbia. In 1976 he started writing "How To Carve (and paint) Totem Poles." His three children, (Paul Jr., Mary, and Phyllis), edited his seventh grade writing style, but publishers weren't interested in his product. The Luveras decided to invest their life savings and publish 5000 books on the

Image of 2013.077.191 - Negative

2013.077.191 - Negative

Paul N. Luvera, Sr., retired in 1957 after running Luvera's Grocery and being a Washington State Senator. Approximately 1962 he started a second career, carving totem poles which his wife Mary painted in "real" Indian colors. Unable to find a book telling how to carve Indian totem poles, Luvera taught himself to carve in the authentic style from several tribal post cards he bought in Victoria, British Columbia. In 1976 he started writing "How To Carve (and paint) Totem Poles." His three children, (Paul Jr., Mary, and Phyllis), edited his seventh grade writing style, but publishers weren't interested in his product. The Luveras decided to invest their life savings and publish 5000 books on the

Image of 2013.077.269 - Correspondence

2013.077.269 - Correspondence

After the Luvera totem pole at Washington Park fell in the storm of December 18, 1990, the remains were cut in sections and taken a storage site at the city dump. The city dump was opened to city residents as a place to leave damaged trees, etc., from the storm. Parts of the totem pole were taken away from the unsecured site by unknown individuals. In a letter to her siblings Phyllis Luvera Ennes and Paul Luvera, Jr. on March 21, 1991, Anita Luvera Mayer detailed the destruction and what had happened between the storm and mid-March. She ended with, "this is a wanton example of indifference to craftsmanship, Dad's generosity, and what this pole represented to the community and the family." Cop

Image of 2013.077.271 - Correspondence

2013.077.271 - Correspondence

After the Luvera totem pole at Washington Park fell in the storm of December 18, 1990, the remains were cut in sections and taken a storage site at the city dump. The city dump was opened to city residents as a place to leave damaged trees, etc., from the storm. Parts of the totem pole were taken away from the unsecured site by unknown individuals. In a letter to Mayor Rice on March 22, 1991, Paul Luvera, Jr., an attorney, was "irate" about how the totem pole was treated, especially by the City Park Department. "I am absolutely astounded that having received this donation from our family the city would not have satisfied it's (sic) moral and legal responsibility to have guarded the pole. I

Image of 2013.077.272 - Correspondence

2013.077.272 - Correspondence

After the Luvera totem pole at Washington Park fell in the storm of December 18, 1990, the remains were cut in sections and taken a storage site at the city dump. The city dump was opened to city residents as a place to leave damaged trees, etc., from the storm. Parts of the totem pole were taken away from the unsecured site by unknown individuals. In a letter to Paul Luvera, Jr. on April 7, 1991, Phyllis Luvera Ennes told of some family matters, then got to the totem pole issue. Her mother, Mary Babarovich Luvera, was upset that no one had contacted her about the destroyed totem pole either in person or by letter; "After all, she painted the pole originally and was one of the donors." Phyl

Image of 2013.077.274 - Correspondence

2013.077.274 - Correspondence

After the Luvera totem pole at Washington Park fell in the storm of December 18, 1990, the remains were cut in sections and taken a storage site at the city dump. The city dump was opened to city residents as a place to leave damaged trees, etc., from the storm. Parts of the totem pole were taken away from the unsecured site by unknown individuals. On April 9, 1991, Anita Luvera Mayer wrote a letter to Mr. Sternberg and Ms. Hartford thanking them for the return of two pieces of the totem pole. "We are so thankful that you realized the value of the pieces and salvaged them from the burn pile at the city site. To have these pieces of the pole back is important to the community and our family."

Image of 2013.077.275 - Correspondence

2013.077.275 - Correspondence

After the Luvera totem pole at Washington Park fell in the storm of December 18, 1990, the remains were cut in sections and taken a storage site at the city dump. The city dump was opened to city residents as a place to leave damaged trees, etc., from the storm. Parts of the totem pole were taken away from the unsecured site by unknown individuals. On April10, 1991, Anita Luvera Mayer wrote a letter to Nancy (last name unknown). Mayer had received a phone call from Mr. Rowell of City Parks Department disputing what Steve Colby had written in a letter to Mayer about who ordered the cutting up of the totem pole. Copies of this letter were sent to Phyllis Luvera Ennes, Paul Luvera, Jr., and Ma

Image of 2013.077.278 - letter

2013.077.278 - letter

After the Luvera totem pole at Washington Park fell in the storm of December 18, 1990, the remains were cut in sections and taken a storage site at the city dump. The city dump was opened to city residents as a place to leave damaged trees, etc., from the storm. Parts of the totem pole were taken away from the unsecured site by unknown individuals. On May 31, 1991, Steve Colby (Director of Parks and Recreation) sent a memorandum of conversation to Anita Luvera Mayer re the discussion held on May 28, 1991, with Colby, Mayer, and Phyllis Luvera Ennes. Two proposals were made: 1) that the city have Tracy Powell repair the totem pole and have the pole returned to the Luvera family for placement

Image of 2013.077.287 - Memorandum

2013.077.287 - Memorandum

On November 1, 1990, Paul Luvera, Sr., wrote this memorandum to his wife, Mary Babarovich Luvera, and sent a copy to his daughter, Phyllis Luvera Ennes. He wanted the 14-foot totem pole donated to the Chamber of Commerce building at the corner of 9th and Commercial. "We ask for no pay, but a letter of credit, saying we donated a $1500 INDIAN TOTEM POLE, and we request a small sign in front of the building by the TOTEM POLE, saying --' CARVED BY PAST PRESIDENT (1938) OF OUR CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, PAUL N. LUVERA SR. TOTEM PAINTED BY MARY LUVERA. TOTEM CARVED IN 1962.' " He also suggested that the "AMERICAN" might be interested in a photo story. Note: As of March 2015, a totem pole st

Image of 2013.077.290 - Correspondence

2013.077.290 - Correspondence

On December 27, 1991, Phyllis Luvera Ennes wrote a letter to the Executive Director of the Anacortes Chamber of Commerce, Melanie Siefferman. Ennes thanked the Chamber for arranging storage of the 16-foot totem pole Paul Luvera, Sr. carved in 1962 and planned to donate to the new Chamber of Commerce building at 9th and Commercial; the Luvera family was under the impression the building would be named for Paul Luvera, Sr. "Please advise me immediately, in writing, if any of my perceptions are contrary to your intent." Copies of the letter were sent to Mary Babarovich Luvera, Paul Luvera, Jr., and Anita Luvera Mayer.

Image of 2013.077.295.001-.002 - Correspondence

2013.077.295.001-.002 - Correspondence

In regards to the issue of a monetary donation requested by the Anacortes Chamber of Commerce, Phyllis Luvera Ennes wrote a letter to Melanie Siefferman, Executive Director of the Anacortes Chamber of Commerce. She asked from clarification in writing as to whether the naming of the new building would be determined by a financial endowment. Copies of the letter were sent to: Irv York, President, Anacortes Chamber of Commerce Mel Farnsworth Bud Strom Ron Smith Paul Luvera, Jr. Anita Mayer Mary Luvera .001 is the draft with edits .002 is the final letter