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Name LUVERA, Phyllis

Associated Records

Image of 2013.077.349 - Artwork

2013.077.349 - Artwork

Phyllis Luvera Ennes created octagonal-shaped artwork featuring purple and white flowers.

Image of 2013.077.350 - Artwork

2013.077.350 - Artwork

Phyllis Luvera Ennes created this picture of two dinosaurs near a lake or stream. There are four trees that give the impression of a warm climate.

Image of 2013.001.024 - Program, Theater

2013.001.024 - Program, Theater

The Anacortes High School 1945 junior class play was "Don't Take My Penny". The play was presented at the High School Auditorium on April 6, 1945. The cast included Edna Haglund, LeRoy Asseln, Beatrice Brostrom, Terry Mondhan, Ishmael Duckett, Agnes Lind, Phyllis Luvera, Mary Devlin, Milton Larson, Gordon Kidder, Joyce Neville, Louis Grinnell, Janet Sundeen, Joyce Kilgore, Marivonne Stover, Arlowine Cole, Yvonne Symonds, and Pat Hagan. Page one: the cover including name of play, place, and date Page two: synopsis Page three: play cast Page four: crew

Image of 2013.077.351 - Artwork

2013.077.351 - Artwork

Phyllis Luvera Ennes created this picture of a mountain, trees, bushes, flowers, and a building on a piece of yellow cotton cloth. Also included are clouds and dirt or grass.

Image of 2013.077.246.A,B - Leaflet

2013.077.246.A,B - Leaflet

The Anacortes Chamber of Commerce put together this tri-fold leaflet after the passing of Paul N. Luvera, Sr., in 1990. It is titled, "Paul N. Luvera Sr. 1898-1990 A Lifetime of Service to our Community" Phyllis Luvera Ennes was responsible for the text and chronology. Also acknowledged are the Anacortes Museum and the Skagit County Historical Museum. 1898 born in Reggio di Calabria, Italy 1911 emigrated to Coleman, Alberta, Canada 1918 moved to Anacortes 1922 opened Luvera's Fruit Store at 7th and Commercial 1924 joined Anacortes Chamber of Commerce and Fidalgo Masonic Lodge No. 77; became United States citizen 1926 married Mary T. Babarovich 1929 joi

Image of 2013.077.252 - letter

2013.077.252 - letter

In 1967 Paul Luvera carved a 30-foot Thunderbird totem pole for the Boy Scout World Jamboree in Farragut, Idaho. Following the event the pole was donated to the City of Anacortes and placed at Sunset Beach in Washington Park. A winter storm in late 1990 toppled it to the ground; during the removal it was cut into 10-foot sections and taken for storage to the old city landfill site at 37th Street and A Avenue. Some parts were subsequently stolen and the few remnants later returned to the family. Following the article in the ANACORTES AMERICAN (2013.077.251), more letters were written. This letter was written to the ANACORTES AMERICAN on April 9, 1991, asking questions as to why the

Image of 2013.077.253 - letter

2013.077.253 - letter

In 1967 Paul Luvera carved a 30-foot Thunderbird totem pole for the Boy Scout World Jamboree in Farragut, Idaho. Following the event the pole was donated to the City of Anacortes and placed at Sunset Beach in Washington Park. A winter storm in late 1990 toppled it to the ground; during the removal it was cut into 10-foot sections and taken for storage to the old city landfill site at 37th Street and A Avenue. Some parts were subsequently stolen and the few remnants later returned to the family. Following the article in the ANACORTES AMERICAN (2013.077.251), more letters were written. This letter was written to Larry F. Martin, a friend of Paul Luvera, Sr. Phyllis Luvera Ennes encl

Image of 2013.077.254.001-.002 - letter

2013.077.254.001-.002 - letter

In 1967 Paul Luvera carved a 30-foot Thunderbird totem pole for the Boy Scout World Jamboree in Farragut, Idaho. Following the event the pole was donated to the City of Anacortes and placed at Sunset Beach in Washington Park. A winter storm in late 1990 toppled it to the ground; during the removal it was cut into 10-foot sections and taken for storage to the old city landfill site at 37th Street and A Avenue. Some parts were subsequently stolen and the few remnants later returned to the family. Following the article in the ANACORTES AMERICAN (2013.077.251), more letters were written. This letter was written to Phyllis Luvera Ennes from her brother Paul Luvera, Jr. He is apparently

Image of 2013.077.255.001-.002 - letter

2013.077.255.001-.002 - letter

In 1967 Paul Luvera carved a 30-foot Thunderbird totem pole for the Boy Scout World Jamboree in Farragut, Idaho. Following the event the pole was donated to the City of Anacortes and placed at Sunset Beach in Washington Park. A winter storm in late 1990 toppled it to the ground; during the removal it was cut into 10-foot sections and taken for storage to the old city landfill site at 37th Street and A Avenue. Some parts were subsequently stolen and the few remnants later returned to the family. Following the article in the ANACORTES AMERICAN (2013.077.251), more letters were written. This letter was written to Phyllis Luvera Ennes and Anita Luvera Ennes from Steve Colby, Director o

Image of 2013.077.269 - Correspondence

2013.077.269 - Correspondence

After the Luvera totem pole at Washington Park fell in the storm of December 18, 1990, the remains were cut in sections and taken a storage site at the city dump. The city dump was opened to city residents as a place to leave damaged trees, etc., from the storm. Parts of the totem pole were taken away from the unsecured site by unknown individuals. In a letter to her siblings Phyllis Luvera Ennes and Paul Luvera, Jr. on March 21, 1991, Anita Luvera Mayer detailed the destruction and what had happened between the storm and mid-March. She ended with, "this is a wanton example of indifference to craftsmanship, Dad's generosity, and what this pole represented to the community and the family." Cop

Image of 2013.077.270.A,B - Correspondence

2013.077.270.A,B - Correspondence

After the Luvera totem pole at Washington Park fell in the storm of December 18, 1990, the remains were cut in sections and taken a storage site at the city dump. The city dump was opened to city residents as a place to leave damaged trees, etc., from the storm. Parts of the totem pole were taken away from the unsecured site by unknown individuals. In a letter to Mayor Rice on March 22, 1991, Phyllis Luvera Ennes wrote: "I have tried to envision the extenuating circumstances that might have led to the final destruction of my father's 30-foot totem pole that was donated to the City and located at Washington Park. Certainly, the December storm that felled the pole presented a myriad of immediat

Image of 2013.077.271 - Correspondence

2013.077.271 - Correspondence

After the Luvera totem pole at Washington Park fell in the storm of December 18, 1990, the remains were cut in sections and taken a storage site at the city dump. The city dump was opened to city residents as a place to leave damaged trees, etc., from the storm. Parts of the totem pole were taken away from the unsecured site by unknown individuals. In a letter to Mayor Rice on March 22, 1991, Paul Luvera, Jr., an attorney, was "irate" about how the totem pole was treated, especially by the City Park Department. "I am absolutely astounded that having received this donation from our family the city would not have satisfied it's (sic) moral and legal responsibility to have guarded the pole. I

Image of 2013.077.272 - Correspondence

2013.077.272 - Correspondence

After the Luvera totem pole at Washington Park fell in the storm of December 18, 1990, the remains were cut in sections and taken a storage site at the city dump. The city dump was opened to city residents as a place to leave damaged trees, etc., from the storm. Parts of the totem pole were taken away from the unsecured site by unknown individuals. In a letter to Paul Luvera, Jr. on April 7, 1991, Phyllis Luvera Ennes told of some family matters, then got to the totem pole issue. Her mother, Mary Babarovich Luvera, was upset that no one had contacted her about the destroyed totem pole either in person or by letter; "After all, she painted the pole originally and was one of the donors." Phyl

Image of 2013.077.274 - Correspondence

2013.077.274 - Correspondence

After the Luvera totem pole at Washington Park fell in the storm of December 18, 1990, the remains were cut in sections and taken a storage site at the city dump. The city dump was opened to city residents as a place to leave damaged trees, etc., from the storm. Parts of the totem pole were taken away from the unsecured site by unknown individuals. On April 9, 1991, Anita Luvera Mayer wrote a letter to Mr. Sternberg and Ms. Hartford thanking them for the return of two pieces of the totem pole. "We are so thankful that you realized the value of the pieces and salvaged them from the burn pile at the city site. To have these pieces of the pole back is important to the community and our family."

Image of 2013.077.275 - Correspondence

2013.077.275 - Correspondence

After the Luvera totem pole at Washington Park fell in the storm of December 18, 1990, the remains were cut in sections and taken a storage site at the city dump. The city dump was opened to city residents as a place to leave damaged trees, etc., from the storm. Parts of the totem pole were taken away from the unsecured site by unknown individuals. On April10, 1991, Anita Luvera Mayer wrote a letter to Nancy (last name unknown). Mayer had received a phone call from Mr. Rowell of City Parks Department disputing what Steve Colby had written in a letter to Mayer about who ordered the cutting up of the totem pole. Copies of this letter were sent to Phyllis Luvera Ennes, Paul Luvera, Jr., and Ma

Image of 2013.077.283 - Memorandum

2013.077.283 - Memorandum

After the Luvera totem pole at Washington Park fell in the storm of December 18, 1990, the remains were cut in sections and taken a storage site at the city dump. The city dump was opened to city residents as a place to leave damaged trees, etc., from the storm. Parts of the totem pole were taken away from the unsecured site by unknown individuals. During the period of January-May 1991, an anonymous phone call was received, probably by Phyllis Luvera Ennes. The lady didn't want to give her name or write a letter. The quotes below are from a memo about the call. "Destruction of pole an outrage, a crime" "Park Dept. personnel should be fired." "Whoever responsible either didn't like

Image of 2013.077.278 - letter

2013.077.278 - letter

After the Luvera totem pole at Washington Park fell in the storm of December 18, 1990, the remains were cut in sections and taken a storage site at the city dump. The city dump was opened to city residents as a place to leave damaged trees, etc., from the storm. Parts of the totem pole were taken away from the unsecured site by unknown individuals. On May 31, 1991, Steve Colby (Director of Parks and Recreation) sent a memorandum of conversation to Anita Luvera Mayer re the discussion held on May 28, 1991, with Colby, Mayer, and Phyllis Luvera Ennes. Two proposals were made: 1) that the city have Tracy Powell repair the totem pole and have the pole returned to the Luvera family for placement

Image of 2013.077.287 - Memorandum

2013.077.287 - Memorandum

On November 1, 1990, Paul Luvera, Sr., wrote this memorandum to his wife, Mary Babarovich Luvera, and sent a copy to his daughter, Phyllis Luvera Ennes. He wanted the 14-foot totem pole donated to the Chamber of Commerce building at the corner of 9th and Commercial. "We ask for no pay, but a letter of credit, saying we donated a $1500 INDIAN TOTEM POLE, and we request a small sign in front of the building by the TOTEM POLE, saying --' CARVED BY PAST PRESIDENT (1938) OF OUR CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, PAUL N. LUVERA SR. TOTEM PAINTED BY MARY LUVERA. TOTEM CARVED IN 1962.' " He also suggested that the "AMERICAN" might be interested in a photo story. Note: As of March 2015, a totem pole st

Image of 2013.077.290 - Correspondence

2013.077.290 - Correspondence

On December 27, 1991, Phyllis Luvera Ennes wrote a letter to the Executive Director of the Anacortes Chamber of Commerce, Melanie Siefferman. Ennes thanked the Chamber for arranging storage of the 16-foot totem pole Paul Luvera, Sr. carved in 1962 and planned to donate to the new Chamber of Commerce building at 9th and Commercial; the Luvera family was under the impression the building would be named for Paul Luvera, Sr. "Please advise me immediately, in writing, if any of my perceptions are contrary to your intent." Copies of the letter were sent to Mary Babarovich Luvera, Paul Luvera, Jr., and Anita Luvera Mayer.

Image of 2013.077.292 - Correspondence

2013.077.292 - Correspondence

In a letter dated January 6, 1992, Phyllis Luvera Ennes expresses her anger to Paul Luvera, Jr. and Mary Luvera Mayer that the Chamber of Commerce wants a substantial endowment in order to name to new Chamber building for their father, Paul Luvera, Sr. "My immediate reaction is that any honor/memorial that HAS to be purchased is of questionable value."