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Name Ford tri-motor

Associated Records

Image of WF 2088 - March's Point Airfield - Ford Tri-motor

WF 2088 - March's Point Airfield - Ford Tri-motor

This Ford Tri-motor airplane #9612 is viewed at March's Point airfield. "In 1927, Ford Motor Company produced the Ford Tri-motor, one of the first all-metal airplanes. It was often referred to as the TIN GOOSE or FLYING WASHBOARD. It was the first plane created to carry passengers rather than mail, with a seating capacity of 12. As the name indicates, the airplane had three engines, which allowed it to fly higher and faster than other airplanes of the same time period. The Tri-motor could reach speeds up to 130 miles per hour. A Ford 4-AT-15 Tri-motor monoplane, piloted by Berndt Balehen, was used in the first flight over the South Pole in November of 1929." This plane may have been at the

Image of WF 2084.A,B - March's Point Airfield - Ford Tri-motor

WF 2084.A,B - March's Point Airfield - Ford Tri-motor

This Ford Tri-motor airplane #9612 is viewed at March's Point airfield. "In 1927, Ford Motor Company produced the Ford Tri-motor, one of the first all-metal airplanes. It was often referred to as the TIN GOOSE or FLYING WASHBOARD. It was the first plane created to carry passengers rather than mail, with a seating capacity of 12. As the name indicates, the airplane had three engines, which allowed it to fly higher and faster than other airplanes of the same time period. The Tri-motor could reach speeds up to 130 miles per hour. A Ford 4-AT-15 Tri-motor monoplane, piloted by Berndt Balehen, was used in the first flight over the South Pole in November of 1929." This plane may have been at the

Image of WF 2085 - March's Point Airfield - Ford Tri-motor

WF 2085 - March's Point Airfield - Ford Tri-motor

This Ford Tri-motor airplane #9612 is viewed at March's Point airfield. "In 1927, Ford Motor Company produced the Ford Tri-motor, one of the first all-metal airplanes. It was often referred to as the TIN GOOSE or FLYING WASHBOARD. It was the first plane created to carry passengers rather than mail, with a seating capacity of 12. As the name indicates, the airplane had three engines, which allowed it to fly higher and faster than other airplanes of the same time period. The Tri-motor could reach speeds up to 130 miles per hour. A Ford 4-AT-15 Tri-motor monoplane, piloted by Berndt Balehen, was used in the first flight over the South Pole in November of 1929." This plane may have been at the

Image of WF 2086 - March's Point Airfield - Ford Tri-motor

WF 2086 - March's Point Airfield - Ford Tri-motor

This Ford Tri-motor airplane #9612 is viewed at March's Point airfield. "In 1927, Ford Motor Company produced the Ford Tri-motor, one of the first all-metal airplanes. It was often referred to as the TIN GOOSE or FLYING WASHBOARD. It was the first plane created to carry passengers rather than mail, with a seating capacity of 12. As the name indicates, the airplane had three engines, which allowed it to fly higher and faster than other airplanes of the same time period. The Tri-motor could reach speeds up to 130 miles per hour. A Ford 4-AT-15 Tri-motor monoplane, piloted by Berndt Balehen, was used in the first flight over the South Pole in November of 1929." This plane may have been at the

Image of WF 2087 - March's Point Airfield - Ford Tri-motor

WF 2087 - March's Point Airfield - Ford Tri-motor

This Ford Tri-motor airplane #9612 is viewed at March's Point airfield. "In 1927, Ford Motor Company produced the Ford Tri-motor, one of the first all-metal airplanes. It was often referred to as the TIN GOOSE or FLYING WASHBOARD. It was the first plane created to carry passengers rather than mail, with a seating capacity of 12. As the name indicates, the airplane had three engines, which allowed it to fly higher and faster than other airplanes of the same time period. The Tri-motor could reach speeds up to 130 miles per hour. A Ford 4-AT-15 Tri-motor monoplane, piloted by Berndt Balehen, was used in the first flight over the South Pole in November of 1929." This plane may have been at the

Image of WF 2089 - March's Point Airfield - Ford Tri-motor

WF 2089 - March's Point Airfield - Ford Tri-motor

This Ford Tri-motor airplane #9612 is viewed at March's Point airfield. "In 1927, Ford Motor Company produced the Ford Tri-motor, one of the first all-metal airplanes. It was often referred to as the TIN GOOSE or FLYING WASHBOARD. It was the first plane created to carry passengers rather than mail, with a seating capacity of 12. As the name indicates, the airplane had three engines, which allowed it to fly higher and faster than other airplanes of the same time period. The Tri-motor could reach speeds up to 130 miles per hour. A Ford 4-AT-15 Tri-motor monoplane, piloted by Berndt Balehen, was used in the first flight over the South Pole in November of 1929." This plane may have been at the