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Name Prohibition

Associated Records

Image of 2004.006 - Microfilm

2004.006 - Microfilm

Microfilm roll of records of Anacortes Coast Guard base #12 during prohibition for Jan. 1925, Aug. 1929 and March 1933; 110 frames.

Image of 2014.011.053 - Petition

2014.011.053 - Petition

Initiative No. 13 to the Legislature was filed with the Secretary of State on August 23, 1946, by the Washington Temperance Association. It was intitled: "AN ACT, prohibiting the retail sale of beer and wine by any person other than the Sate of Washington, repealing all provisions of existing law pertaining to licensing of retail sale of beer and wine, revoking existing licenses and providing penalties." It would have allowed the sale of wine, beer, and liquor only in Washington State liquor stores and prohibited imbibing in other than private premises.

Image of 2014.011.054 - Letter, Form

2014.011.054 - Letter, Form

A letter from Men and Women against Prohibition was sent to Floyd Lunsford thanking him for his support of the defeat of Initiative No. 13 which would have prohibited the sale of wine and beer and the drinking of it in public places. The initiative was presented to the Legislature in August 1946. Literature from the organization was enclosed for distribution, and Mr. Lunsford was encouraged to thank the local paper if it editorialized against the initiative.

Image of 2014.011.055 - Pamphlet

2014.011.055 - Pamphlet

A pamphlet produced by Men and Women against Prohibition included questions and answers about what might happen if Initiative No. 13 were to pass on November 2. The "answers" imply that a return of the criminal activities of the national Prohibition era would return. All existing retail sales would be prohibited except in the state-run liquor stores; no spirits would be sold by the glass.

Image of 2014.011.056 - Ad, Newspaper

2014.011.056 - Ad, Newspaper

Initiative 13 was presented to the voters in the November 2, 1948, general election. It would have prevented selling alcohol by the drink. According to the advertisement, "it would mean a return to the speakeasy, the bootlegger, the gangster -- and, finally, state-wide PROHIBITION!" The initiative did not pass. On the reverse side of the advertisement are political ads for Payson Peterson for Congressman and Arthur Langlie for Governor. Langlie won his race, and Peterson was defeated.

Image of 2014.011.001.001 - Pamphlet

2014.011.001.001 - Pamphlet

In 1948 Prohibitionists in Washington State tried to prohibit the sale of beer and wine in taverns, groceries, and restaurants. This 16-page pamphlet was prepared and distributed by the Citizens Liquor Control Council, Inc., "an organization of Washington citizens, devoted to liquor control that is in the public interest, and opposed to the return of prohibition." Mr. Clayton Kirkpatrick of the CHICAGO TRIBUNE wrote a series of articles about the "dry" states of Kansas, Oklahoma, and Mississippi and the reality of how "wet" they actually were. These articles are the backbone of the pamphlet, with remarks in red included by the council. The initiative failed. This pamphlet was mailed to F

Image of 2014.011.001.002 - Envelope

2014.011.001.002 - Envelope

This envelope was mailed to Floyd L. Lunsford, 1105 K Avenue, Anacortes, WA, in 1948 by the Men and Women Against Prohibition at 1218 New Washington Hotel, Seattle 1, WA . It contained a pamphlet titled "The Mockery of Prohibition." In 1948 Prohibitionists in Washington State tried to prohibit the sale of beer and wine in taverns, groceries, and restaurants. This 16-page pamphlet was prepared and distributed by the Citizens Liquor Control Council, Inc., "an organization of Washington citizens, devoted to liquor control that is in the public interest, and opposed to the return of prohibition." Mr. Clayton Kirkpatrick of the CHICAGO TRIBUNE wrote a series of articles about the "dry" states

Image of 2013.077.317 - Correspondence

2013.077.317 - Correspondence

Paul Luvera, Sr., wrote many letters to editors of several papers in the last ten years of his life. On November 26, 1986, Luvera sent a letter to the ANACORTES AMERICAN recalling the origin of Causland Park. Luvera was working at the time for $.25 and hour, but donated $5 because, "I expect to spend the rest of my life here in Anacortes, and I want to tell my children and grandchildren that 'I own $5 worth of that park! ' " A handwritten anecdote on the right side of the page tells of Luvera being reprimanded by Chief of Police Al Sellenthin for drinking moonshine at a public dance during Prohibition. After that, Luvera confined his drinking to private homes.

Image of WF 0363.A,B -

WF 0363.A,B -

Anacortes police with captured bootleg liquor still. The photo was taken in front of City Hall -- 1107 5th Street between N and O avenues. Pictured from left to right: Unknown; Policeman Tom March, listed in 1912 city directory as the city marshall - also see WF 4230; Police Chief Al Sellenthin, wearing glasses, police chief 1923-1933 -- also see WF 4644. Note that neither law officer is wearing a uniform. Image was taken prior to the era of police uniforms, which caused citizen complaints. The 9-17-1925, ANACORTES AMERICAN reported, "Anacortes police need to wear star on uniforms: people not from town are not sure of who they are." The 3-11-1926 issue reported, "Anacortes police may get un

Image of WF 0187 - The Joker Saloon

WF 0187 - The Joker Saloon

The Joker Saloon was located at the corner of 3rd and P/Commercial. The 5-15-1890, ANACORTES AMERICAN featured advertisements for the saloon run by Con Sullivan which sold "wines, liquors,cigars." On 9-15-1904, the paper reported, "Con Sullivan to Improve [the Joker]." on 2-16-1911, it was reported the Joker Saloon would "Move into the Shamrock Bar while its frame building is being renovated." The bar apparently lasted until statewide Prohibition went into effect on 1-1-1916. By that year 23 of the 48 states had enacted laws forbidding the sale of liquor. On 1-1-1919, the 18th Amendment made prohibition the law of the land throughout the U.S. Note the spittoons on the floor, and the te

Image of WF 0189.A,B - Unknown Anacortes Saloon

WF 0189.A,B - Unknown Anacortes Saloon

Typical of many Anacortes saloons, primarily clustered at the foot of P/Commercial Avenue in early 1900s. Six men including the bartender are standing out front. Note the two pups between the bartender's legs. The following sampling of articles from the ANACORTES AMERICAN describes the era in which this bar operated. 1891 [3/19] "A drunken row occurred last Friday morning near the corner of P and 3rd which resulted in one man being brutally beaten and disfigured for life." 1902 [7/10] "To judge from the violent attempts at music that they are making in some of the saloons on lower Commercial Avenue, the players or the things played upon must be subject to something

Image of WF 1772 - WCTU picnic - Bowman's Bay

WF 1772 - WCTU picnic - Bowman's Bay

This is a series of five photos of the annual Women's Christian Temperance Union (WCTU) summer picnic on July 16, 1937, at Bowman's Bay. The WCTU was an extremely influential organization in Anacortes that began in 1884, led by Carrie White who lived south of Fidalgo Bay at the present site of Similk Beach Golf Course. The 7-28-1883 NORTHWEST ENTERPRISE reported, "There will be an outdoor meeting next Sunday in Anacortes for the purposes of organizing a WCTU branch. It is expected that a meeting will also be held at Fidalgo." White was elected the second Washington Territory president of the WCTU. The 7-11-1885 issue reported, "Carrie White has been elected territorial president of the WC

Image of WF 1773 - WCTU picnic - Bowman's Bay

WF 1773 - WCTU picnic - Bowman's Bay

This is a series of five photos of the annual Women's Christian Temperance Union (WCTU) summer picnic on July 16, 1937, at Bowman's Bay. The WCTU was an extremely influential organization in Anacortes that began in 1884, led by Carrie White who lived south of Fidalgo Bay at the present site of Similk Beach Golf Course. The 7-28-1883 NORTHWEST ENTERPRISE reported, "There will be an outdoor meeting next Sunday in Anacortes for the purposes of organizing a WCTU branch. It is expected that a meeting will also be held at Fidalgo." White was elected the second Washington Territory president of the WCTU. The 7-11-1885 issue reported, "Carrie White has been elected territorial president of the WC

Image of WF 1774 - WCTU picnic - Bowman's Bay

WF 1774 - WCTU picnic - Bowman's Bay

This is a series of five photos of the annual Women's Christian Temperance Union (WCTU) summer picnic on July 16, 1937, at Bowman's Bay. The WCTU was an extremely influential organization in Anacortes that began in 1884, led by Carrie White who lived south of Fidalgo Bay at the present site of Similk Beach Golf Course. The 7-28-1883 NORTHWEST ENTERPRISE reported, "There will be an outdoor meeting next Sunday in Anacortes for the purposes of organizing a WCTU branch. It is expected that a meeting will also be held at Fidalgo." White was elected the second Washington Territory president of the WCTU. The 7-11-1885 issue reported, "Carrie White has been elected territorial president of the WC

Image of WF 1775 - WCTU picnic - Bowman's Bay

WF 1775 - WCTU picnic - Bowman's Bay

This is a series of five photos of the annual Women's Christian Temperance Union (WCTU) summer picnic on July 16, 1937, at Bowman's Bay. The WCTU was an extremely influential organization in Anacortes that began in 1884, led by Carrie White who lived south of Fidalgo Bay at the present site of Similk Beach Golf Course. The 7-28-1883 NORTHWEST ENTERPRISE reported, "There will be an outdoor meeting next Sunday in Anacortes for the purposes of organizing a WCTU branch. It is expected that a meeting will also be held at Fidalgo." White was elected the second Washington Territory president of the WCTU. The 7-11-1885 issue reported, "Carrie White has been elected territorial president of the WC

Image of WF 1776 - WCTU picnic - Bowman's Bay

WF 1776 - WCTU picnic - Bowman's Bay

This is a series of five photos of the annual Women's Christian Temperance Union (WCTU) summer picnic on July 16, 1937, at Bowman's Bay. The WCTU was an extremely influential organization in Anacortes that began in 1884, led by Carrie White who lived south of Fidalgo Bay at the present site of Similk Beach Golf Course. The 7-28-1883 NORTHWEST ENTERPRISE reported, "There will be an outdoor meeting next Sunday in Anacortes for the purposes of organizing a WCTU branch. It is expected that a meeting will also be held at Fidalgo." White was elected the second Washington Territory president of the WCTU. The 7-11-1885 issue reported, "Carrie White has been elected territorial president of the WC

Image of E.XII.028.A-C - E.XII.028A Deaccessioned

E.XII.028.A-C - E.XII.028A Deaccessioned

Postcards: A. Postcard with slogan regarding Prohibition. "Were all dry in this family-except the baby!" B. Dutch couple in car with Anacortes banner. C. Dutch girl with quote.

Image of 2015.059.080.001-.003 - Mural of Kidder's taxi

2015.059.080.001-.003 - Mural of Kidder's taxi

Image of Bill Mitchell's mural of E.J., Ann and Ted Kidder and their Anacortes Stage and Taxi Co. Buick in 1922. E.J. was a licensed carrier who also transported bootleg liquor during Prohibition. The mural is on the north side of Johnny Picasso's ceramic painting and coffee shop business at 501 Commercial Avenue. Bill Mitchell began the Anacortes Mural Project in 1984. Over the course of 30 years Mitchell painted more than 150 murals, the majority of which are in downtown Anacortes. This series of mural photos was taken in April 2009.