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Name SWINOMISH

Associated Records

Image of 2009.023.001 - Scrapbook

2009.023.001 - Scrapbook

No. 1 of six scrapbooks titled: Snagboat History. Scrapbooks include photographs and newspaper clippings pertaining to the W.T. Preston. They belonged to Dennis Hamburg, son of Norm Hamburg. Norm Hamburg had a 42 year career on the W.T. Preston.

Image of 2009.023.002 - Scrapbook

2009.023.002 - Scrapbook

No. 2 of six scrapbooks titled: Snagboat History. Scrapbooks include photographs and newspaper clippings pertaining to the W.T. Preston. They belonged to Dennis Hamburg, son of Norm Hamburg. Norm Hamburg had a 42 year career on the W.T. Preston.

Image of 2009.023.003 - Scrapbook

2009.023.003 - Scrapbook

No. 3 of six scrapbooks titled: Snagboat History. Scrapbooks include photographs and newspaper clippings pertaining to the W.T. Preston. They belonged to Dennis Hamburg, son of Norm Hamburg. Norm Hamburg had a 42 year career on the W.T. Preston.

Image of 2011.019.057 - Map

2011.019.057 - Map

Map of Ship Harbor Fidalgo Island Packing Company including Chinese housing, kitchen, mess hall, etc. Cannery workers included Samish, Swinomish, and Lummi Indians who cleaned and packed the salmon. Chinese workers made the cans, lacquared, labeled and cased them in a warehouse.

Image of 2012.109.008 - Report

2012.109.008 - Report

History of the snagboats working tributaries of local rivers and the Puget Sound. They included: the SKAGIT I, built in Seattle in 1882 by the United States government Captained by E.H. Jefferson until 1896; SKAGIT II built in 1896 captained by E.H. Jefferson until 1905 and later by F.A. Siegel 1905-1914; the SWINOMMISH, built in 1914, and captained by F.A. Siegel until 1929; The W.T. Preston #1 using parts of the SWINOMISH and building a wood hull captained by F.A. Siegel until 1936. Captain George S. Murch was Master of her until 1939; The fifth and last snagboat was the W.T. PRESTON #2 built with a steel hull at lake Union Dry Dock Co. and transfer from W.T. Preston #1 included main engine

Image of 2014.045.002.002 - Article

2014.045.002.002 - Article

The SKAGIT VALLEY HERALD ran a photo of the W.T. PRESTON on September 10, 1973. "Paddlewheeler in LaConner - The familiar paddlewheeler W. T. PRESTON, shown at left clearing snags on the Skagit River, has been installing pilings in Swinomish Slough in LaConner. Once named the SWINOMISH, The Army Corps of Engineer's snag boat works the northern Puget Sound and the Skagit River."

Image of 2009.023.004.013.002 - Article

2009.023.004.013.002 - Article

A retrospective photo in the SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER showed the snagboat SWINOMISH as she passed through the Ballard Locks on opening day, August 4, 1916. No. 4 of six scrapbooks titled: Snagboat History. Scrapbooks include photographs and newspaper clippings pertaining to the W.T. Preston. They belonged to Dennis Hamburg, son of Norm Hamburg. Norm Hamburg had a 42 year career on the W.T. Preston.

Image of 2009.023.004.016 - Article

2009.023.004.016 - Article

Seattle's number one tourist attraction was Hiram Chittenden Locks at the time of its 50th anniversary. The undated and unidentifed source of the article states that the locks opened July 4, 1917, but other resources put the date as July 4, 1916. Commerative coins were issued to mark the anniversary, and the SWINOMISH is shown as she passed through the locks at its opening. No. 4 of six scrapbooks titled: Snagboat History. Scrapbooks include photographs and newspaper clippings pertaining to the W.T. Preston. They belonged to Dennis Hamburg, son of Norm Hamburg. Norm Hamburg had a 42 year career on the W.T. Preston.

Image of 2004.049 - Lubricator, Pressure

2004.049 - Lubricator, Pressure

Brass 1/2 pint displacement lubricator with fittings used on steam dynamo on the W. T. PRESTON snagboat prior to c1961 when present dynamo was installed. Believed also to be used on the sternwheeler SWINOMISH from 1914-c 1961. Incomplete as it is missing a few pieces. Item was salvaged by Stan Nelson when object was thrown in scrap brass bin after dynamo was changed.

Image of 1999.030.041 - SWINOMISH tied to other boats

1999.030.041 - SWINOMISH tied to other boats

Copy photo of SWINOMISH tied up with SKAGIT and two other vessels alongside.

Image of 2007.051.004 - Snagboat crew on Texas Deck

2007.051.004 - Snagboat crew on Texas Deck

Snagboat crew taken on the Texas Deck of the SWINOMISH (1914-1939)

Image of 2004.037.003 - T.C. Reed

2004.037.003 - T.C. Reed

A.) T.C. Reed, B.) "SWINOMISH", C.) "Row vs. Wade: the Great American Fishing Controversy".

Image of 2004.037.004 - SWINOMISH

2004.037.004 - SWINOMISH

SWINOMISH sternwheeler going through a channel.

Image of 2004.037.005 - Group of three boats:  SWINOMISH, PEGGY, and T.C. REED

2004.037.005 - Group of three boats: SWINOMISH, PEGGY, and T.C. REED

Group of three boat photos photocopied on one page. T.C. REED, SWINOMISH and another sternwheeler.

Image of 2007.010.032 - SWINOMISH

2007.010.032 - SWINOMISH

SWINOMISH in 1928 unloading barge at Webster Point after dredging the Lake Washington Ship Canal. This photo also appears in the first scrapbook compiled by Norm Hamburg, 2009.023.001.

Image of 2007.010.040 - Ramming of Skagit Riverside bridge by SWINOMISH.

2007.010.040 - Ramming of Skagit Riverside bridge by SWINOMISH.

This photo of is of the SWINOMISH which sunk after hitting the Great Northern Railway Bridge on the Skagit River in December 1917. Captain Siegel was in charge. It was raised after 2.5 months. The snagboat SWINOMISH was built at LaConner in 1903 and worked for the Corps of Engineers pulling snags out of Puget Sound waterways and local rivers from 1914 to 1929. It replaced the SKAGIT, which had been built in 1885. The SWINOMISH, in turn, was replaced by the W. T. PRESTON which was built with some parts from the SWINOMISH. It seemed fitting that this boat built to clear navigable channels was named for the Swinomish Slough, a body of water that, "for its length requires more dredging th

Image of 2007.010.044 - SWINOMISH

2007.010.044 - SWINOMISH

Several boats docked along the side of the snagboats SWINOMISH and SKAGIT.

Image of 2007.010.052 - SKAGIT AND SWINOMISH snagboats

2007.010.052 - SKAGIT AND SWINOMISH snagboats

SKAGIT and SWINOMISH at dock.

Image of 2007.010.053 - SWINOMISH at shipyard

2007.010.053 - SWINOMISH at shipyard

SWINOMISH at shipyard.

Image of WF 5457 - SWINOMISH snagboat, unknown location

WF 5457 - SWINOMISH snagboat, unknown location

The snagboat SWINOMISH was built at LaConner in 1903 and worked for the Corps of Engineers pulling snags out of Puget Sound waterways and local rivers from 1914 to 1929. It replaced the SKAGIT, which had been built in 1885. The SWINOMISH, in turn, was replaced by the W. T. PRESTON which was built with some parts from the SWINOMISH. It seemed fitting that this boat built to clear navigable channels was named for the Swinomish Slough, a body of water that, "for its length requires more dredging than any other navigable waterway in this state." See the SEATTLE TIMES Rotogravure, 6-8-1947.