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Name shares

Associated Records

Image of 2010.052.002 - Records

2010.052.002 - Records

Stock certificate: "Incorproated under the laws of the State of Washington, No. 68, 50 Shares, Crest Canning Co., Fully Paid, Capital Stock $150,000.00 Non-Assessable This certifies that Joe D. Capaan is the owner of Fifty Shares of the Capital Stock of Crest Canning Co. transferable only on the books of this Corporation in person or by Attorney upon surrender of this Certificate properly endorsed. In Witness Whereof, the said Corporation has caused this Certificate to be signed by its duly authorized officers and its Corporate Seal to be hereunto affixed at Seattle, Washington, this 27th day of September, A.D., 1921 Jos. ___ston, Secretary, H. A. Fleager, President. shares $1.00 each

Image of E.II.049 - Stocks

E.II.049 - Stocks

Capital Stock Certificate in the amount of $30,000 the State of Washington No. 52 Shares 9 3/8 Burke Shingle Co., Inc. This Certifies that Simon Anderson is the owner of nine and three eights Shares of the Capital Stock of The burke Shingle Co., Inc. transferable only on the books of the Corporation by the holder hereof in person or by Attorney upon surrender of this Certificate properly endorsed. In Witness whereof, the said Corporation has caused this certificate to be signed by its duty this 9th day of June 1920. H. W. Graham, Secretary, H. R. Burke, President Shares $100 each." Back side has two 25 cent stamps on it. It is not filled in, but reads: For Value Receive

Image of 1997.019.001.029 - Check, Bank

1997.019.001.029 - Check, Bank

Mrs. Lloyd Baker wrote a check to Anacortes Plywood, Inc. for $1000 on July 13, 1937, to purchase 10 shares of plywood stock. Anacortes Veneer began in 1937 as Anacortes Plywood, Inc., a workers cooperative built on the former site of Fidalgo Lumber and Box which had burned about two years before. In 1936, Olympia employees of Washington Veneer decided to organize their own cooperative plywood mill. Their undertaking was representative of the many "cooperative" efforts in the mid-1930s, from farming to lumber mills, which flourished in the midst of the Great Depression. The Olympia group initially chose Port Angeles for their mill site and organized on 1-29-1937 as Port Angeles Plywood, In