Museum logo
Museum logo

Photo Record

  • Email This Page
  • Send Feedback
Catalog Number WF 4903
Caption copy work for Alice Kellogg Cahail
Description This image of a man was copied by Brady for Alice Kellogg Cahail. Alice Cahail was the granddaughter of one of Puget Sound's most renowned pioneer physicians, Dr. John Coe Kellogg (1820-1901). Kellogg brought his family to Washington over the Oregon Trail in 1852, settling on Whidbey Island in 1854. He family's farm was on Admiralty Head, present-day site of Fort Casey. Known as the "Canoe Doctor," Kellogg treated the sick and injured throughout the northern Puget Sound region, from Seattle to the Canadian border, including Fidalgo Island. See: A COMMON NEED, WHIDBEY GENERAL HOSPITAL AND THE HISTORY OF MEDICAL CARE ON WHIDBEY ISLAND, 1850-1900, by Theresa Trebon and available in the Anacortes Museum library. Kellogg's son, Albert, married Edith Dillion in 1881 and Alice was their first child; she was named for Albert's sister, Alice, who married Rolland Denny of Seattle, son of Seattle founder Arthur Denny. Alice grew up to become a schoolteacher who taught in many locations from Whidbey Island, to Concrete, and possibly Anacortes. She was also a writer who wrote THE LIFE OF DR. JOHN C. KELLOGG, SEA CAPTAINS OF WHIDBEY ISLAND, and contributed columns of local history to the ANACORTES AMERICAN in the early 1940s. Alice first married William Miller c. 1909; he was killed in 1913. One year later, her four year old son, Fred, died in a tragic accident in Coupeville. Alice remarried on 7-16-1917, to Earl Cahail in Mt. Vernon and they had two children, Earl and Margaret. They lived on Guemes. Alice and Earl are both buried at Sunnyside Cemetery in Coupeville. The woman in this image may be from either the Kellogg or Cahail family.
Date 1800s c. late
Photographer BRADY, Ferd
Collection Wallie Funk Collection
Subjects People
Place - Anacortes, WA
Credit line Donated by Wallie Funk, Wallie Funk Collection
Place Anacortes, WA
Search Terms people
portrait
Object Name Negative